When we first heard about this one, we said, 'how can you have great Pollo a La Brasa without the Brasa'?  Well, hold on to the doors because this fusing of the Classic Pollo a la Brasa with the Louisiana famous method of deep frying Birds (or any animal for that matter) results in some of the most succulent chicken we have ever tasted.  So forget about the grill for a moment, the Bird is is turned up to 11! This recipe is a spin on the Classic Pollo a la Brasa with the only variations being the cooking method and the hardware.

As with the Classic, after making this recipe a few times, you may want to improvise the marinade paste to 'make it your own'. Please experiment and let us know how it goes. Remember one thing: this is supposed to be a paste, so keep you liquids to a minimum.

This classic should be served with the usual suspects (huacatay/aji sauce, mayo, french fries, salad(?)).

A Word of Caution: As anyone that has used one of these things before knows, you may want to be drinking Ice Cold Inca Colas rather than Beers while operating a deep-fryer.  Nothing will get you on Fark quicker than a Drunken mishap with one of these babies.


Instructions

Ingredients:

  • 1 (2 1/2 to 3 1/2 pound) broiler-fryer chicken
  • 1 tablespoon rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon huacatay (many substitues - check substitutions)
  • 1/2 tablespoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon Ground Achiote(Annato) (substitue Paprika)
  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon ginger paste
  • 1 tablespoon aji (either fresh or minced fresh - check substitutions)
  • 2 tablespoons garlic paste
  • 1/4 cup beer (any ale will do)
  • splash vinegar
  • salt and pepper
  • Cooking oil with a high smoke point such as canola oil, peanut oil, safflower oil or a blend for the fryer

Hardware:

  • Upright or Immersion Blender (or mortar and pestle)
  • 'Bayou classic Deep Fryer' as shown above (or comparable Deep Fryer)
  • Chef's Knives
  • Fryer Utensils
  • heavy gloves or oven mitts
  • long-sleeve shirt
  • Kitchen grade Fire Extengisher rated for flammable liquids
  • Themometer for the Oil
  • Cutting Board
  • Meat Thermometer

Condiments:

    Pollo a la KFC

  1. Step 1

    With Deep Frying, always measure the amount of oil needed and NEVER overfill the pot.  Before removing the chicken from its plastic,  Place the chicken in the empty pot and fill with water to just cover the chicken. Remove the chicken and use a ruler to measure the depth of the water– this is the amount of oil needed.

  2. Step 2

    Remove the chicken from its packaging, discard or save the neck and organ package, rinse chicken well inside out, pat dry, cut off excess fat, tuck the wings.

  3. Step 3

    Combine the reaiming ingredients in an upright mixer (or in a bowl if using an Immersion blender). Pulse mixture until you have a paste. If necessary, thin the mixture with water or more beer.

  4. Step 4

  5. Taste it. Add splash of vinegar and salt accordingly.

  6. Step 5

    Rub the chicken with mixture inside and out, making sure you covered all parts of the chickens. Flavoring cannot naturally penetrate chicken skin. Where ever possible, it is important to seperate the skin and apply the paste directly to the meat.

  7. Step 6

    Seal them up in a large zip-top bag (or in a large bowl covered in plastic wrap) and put them in the fridge for 6 hours.

  8. Step 7

    Prepare your fryer and cooking area according to manufacture's instructions.  **See Safety Tips Below

  9. Step 8

    Use a thermometer to monitor the temperature of the oil during operation and keep the temperature at 350 °F (175 °C). Reduce the heat immediately if the oil begins to smoke. Cooking time is about four minutes per pound of chicken, so a 3 1/2 pound chicken needs to be cooked for only about 14 minutes in 350 °F (175 °C) oil. Remove the bird from the Fryer and place on a large cutting board when it has reached an internal temperature slightly over 170 degrees*.
    *See tips below

  10. Step 9

    When the bird has sat for 10 minutes, quarter the bird with a butcher knife and serve with the condiments, maybe some french fries, and who knows...maybe a salad.
    See our post on quatering chicken here



  11. Tips
    • If you really want to make this chicken 'Over the Top Juicy', use the Brining method described the "Brined Pollo a la Brasa" recipe.  Between the Fryer and the Brine
    • If you don't have fresh Huacatay or any Huacatay at all, fret not. Run to Latin market and you will likely be in luck. If you don't have one of those either...don't worry about it. If you have a garden or grocery store near-by, you may be in business: pulverize fresh mint with corriander and a little basil.
      Alternativly, if you are so inclined, grow the stuff. Its easy and grows like a weed, Check out our post on Huacatay.
    • Don't become a post on Fark, be safe--propane, scorching hot oil, and beers can turn a otherwise smart person into a "Darwin award" dumbass
    • A propane burner must never be used indoors, on a wooden deck, under a roof, tree, or near any flammable materials.
    • The propane tank must be placed as far away from the cooker as possible.
    • Never leave the fryer unattended.
    • The chicken must be fully thawed or fresh and must be dry. If ice contacts boiling oil it will cause a boil-over and a flame hazard.
    • Always measure the amount of oil needed and never overfill the pot. Place the chicken in the empty pot and fill with water to just cover the chicken. Remove thechicken and use a ruler to measure the depth of the water– this is the amount of oil needed.
    • Keep children and pets away from the fryer during and after operation.
    • Ensure a fire extinguisher rated for flammable liquids is readily available.
    • Use a thermometer to monitor the temperature of the oil during operation and keep the temperature at 350 °F (175 °C). Reduce the heat immediately if the oil begins to smoke.
    • Use heavy gloves or oven mitts and wear a long-sleeve shirt.
    • Do not consume alcohol during the process.
    • Lower and remove the chicken carefully and slowly to avoid oil splashing or spillage.
    • Oil can be recovered, stored, and reused several times before it becomes rancid or contaminated. Storage life can be extended by filtering used oil and keeping it cool.